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T 603 article

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T603BrusselsAcoordingtoownerhttps://translate.google.nl/translate?sl=cs&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=nl&ie=UTF-8&u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.autoviny.sk%2Freportaze%2F118320%2Ftatra-603-bruselka-trojoka-demonstracia-moci-doplatila-na-nove-zakony&edit-text=

Published under History
July 2nd, 2018

T77a Nonsense by Jalopnik

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A 1937 Tatra 77aPhoto: Kristen Lee (Jalopnik)

About a month ago, I went on vacation in Prague and paid a visit to the very lovely National Technical Museum. It’s awesome and definitely worth a visit. Because if you do go, you’ll see a sleek, silver 1937 Tatra 77a parked on the ground floor, which I later learned was actually shockingly good at killing Nazis during World War II. Here’s why.

In 1934, Czech vehicle manufacturer Tatra—a company led by legendary engineer Hans Ledwinka—launched the first serially produced, aerodynamically designed car called the T77. It was streamlined and sleek, with a body shaped in a wind tunnel and a freaking fin on its back, like some glossy fish car from the future. It was partly designed by Paul Jaray, the engineer behind the aerodynamics of the Zeppelin.

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Since the T77 needed to be as aerodynamic as possible, Tatra minimized the T77’s front face area and stuck the engine—a 2.97-liter air-cooled V8, good for 59 horsepower—in the back, right above the rear axle. This allowed the car to reach speeds of 90 mph, which were considered extremely fast in those pre-war days.

In 1935, the T77 was improved to create its successor, the 77a. The displacement of the V8 was increased to 3.4 liters and power jumped to 70 HP, with a top speed of 93 mph. The cars were among the most advanced and high-tech of their time.

Underneath their flashy hides, the T77 and 77a both had four-wheel independent suspension that used swing axles in the back and a transverse leaf spring system in the front, writes Hemmings.

Stunning as they were to look at, though, the T77 and the 77a were harrowing to drive. Thanks to an extreme rear weight bias and long wheelbase, the T77 and 77a were said to have acutely twitchy handling. It would be altogether too simple to overcook a corner and have the heavy ass swing out into dangerous oversteer. Tire technology from the 1930s probably didn’t do it any favors, either.

The German occupation of Czechoslovakia lasted from 1938 to 1945. The stylish and fast Tatras were very appealing to the Nazis and rose in popularity with high-ranking SS officers, British writer Steve Cole told the Telegraph. And you can totally see why: When you bully your way into a country, you want to take the nicest shit for yourself. Textbook invaders, the lot of them.

Trouble rose when those Nazi officers tried to go fast in their new cars, though. A bunch of them kept crashing and dying.

Per Cole:

“These high-ranking Nazi officers drove this car fast but unfortunately the handling was rubbish, so at a sharp turn they would lose control, spin out and wrap themselves round a tree killing the driver more often than not. The Allies referred to the Tatra cars as their secret weapon against the Nazis.

“More high-ranking Nazi officers were killed in car crashes in the Tatra 77 [and 87] than were killed in active combat. It goes to show that being too flashy doesn’t get you anywhere and will leave you dead.”

Savage, but probably not something the Czechoslovakians were too broken up about.

Eventually, though, Tatra was able to improve the handling of the 77a’s successor, the T87. Its engineers shortened the wheelbase by 12 inches and cast its engine from a lightweight alloy, according to Hemmings. The resulting car was nearly 900 pounds lighter than the outgoing model.

The National Technical Museum’s placard beside the 77a doesn’t mention any of its Nazi-killing prowess, but now you know and you can impress your friends and relatives the next time you pay it a visit.

Published under History, Museums
May 31st, 2018

Why Vaclav Havel did not use a Tatra T613 but a BMW

no comment Posted by smitkees

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Published under History
May 10th, 2018

JK 2500’s evolution into Luka EV

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LUKAEV

TEXT: https://www.facebook.com/lukaevcar/photos/a.1692863827623457.1073741829.1638882133021627/1729013754008464/?type=3&theater

VIDEO: https://www.autoweek.nl/nieuws/luka-ev-elektrisch-en-retro/

Published under History, Miscellaneous
April 25th, 2018

Video + article: Slovak Museum of Design on its way to create a 1:1 T 603X Coupe

no comment Posted by smitkees

T603XCoupeRecreation2018

The Slovak Museum of Design (SMD) has recently completed a visualization of the Tatra 603 X Coupé project, which will be a model for real-world modeling. Even for that time, an attractive car from the city on the Danube obviously gets its second chance.

The Slovak Museum of Design (SMD) has recently completed a visualization of the Tatra 603 X Coupé project, which will be a model for real-world modelling. Even for that time, an attractive car from the city on the Danube obviously gets its second chance.

The modernized successor of the popular “sixth-wheel” from the Socialist era of the former Czechoslovakia was originally produced in Bratislava, but it did not get it into a functional prototype. Tatra Kopřivnice canceled the project.

The history of the first Slovak coupé, which had the potential of serial production thanks to its “quadriver sister”, was composed by SMD enthusiasts from drawings, technical drawings, models and snippets of memories of the direct participants of the dreamed project, which began with the proposal of John Cine in 1963.

Variant Coupé has never seen the light of the world and remained just as an unfulfilled dream. SMD motorists and design enthusiasts believe that this is the last chance for the Tatra people in Bratislava to meet and, together with them, this more than half a year’s car dream has gone into reality.


“We have just completed the computer visualization of the Tatry 603 X Coupé and therefore also data for model milling. The basis was the technical drawings of the Coupé, photographs and the gypsum model of the limousine at 1:10. We sent pictures to Jan Cin’s corrections to Canada. If everything goes well, at the end of May, the author himself will modify the 1: 4 model in the modelar plasticine so that we can then make perfect shapes at a 1: 1 scale, “says the official SMD website.

Even for that time, an attractive car from the city on the Danube obviously gets its second chance.

The modernized successor of the popular “sixth-wheel” from the Socialist era of the former Czechoslovakia was originally produced in Bratislava, but it did not get it into a functional prototype. Tatra Kopřivnice canceled the project.

The history of the first Slovak coupé, which had the potential of serial production thanks to its “quadriver sister”, was composed by SMD enthusiasts from drawings, technical drawings, models and snippets of memories of the direct participants of the dreamed project, which began with the proposal of John Cine in 1963.

Variant Coupé has never seen the light of the world and remained just as an unfulfilled dream. SMD motorists and design enthusiasts believe that this is the last chance for the Tatra people in Bratislava to meet and, together with them, this more than half a year’s car dream has gone into reality.


“We have just completed the computer visualization of the Tatry 603 X Coupé and therefore also data for model milling. The basis was the technical drawings of the Coupé, photographs and the gypsum model of the limousine at 1:10. We sent pictures to Jan Cin’s corrections to Canada. If everything goes well, at the end of May, the author himself will modify the 1: 4 model in the modelar plasticine so that we can then make perfect shapes at a 1: 1 scale, “says the official SMD website.

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Published under History, Miscellaneous, Video
April 25th, 2018

TWO ADVENTURERS SET OUT ON ZIKMUND AND HANZELKA COMMEMORATIVE TOUR

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http://www.radio.cz/en/section/panorama/two-adventurers-set-out-on-zikmund-and-hanzelka-commemorative-tour

Published under Events & Meetings, History
April 18th, 2018

Tatraplan Svet Motoru Test 1951

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Slavné dobové testy: Jak si vedl legendární Tatraplan?

English text: https://translate.google.nl/translate?sl=cs&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=nl&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.auto.cz%2Fslavne-testy-sveta-motoru-tatraplan-113133&edit-text=&act=url

Original text: http://www.auto.cz/slavne-testy-sveta-motoru-tatraplan-113133

Published under History
March 16th, 2018

Hans Ledwinka

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Hans Ledwinka

Hans Ledwinka

16 February, 2018

Hans Ledwinka – the inventor of the world-renowned Tatra concept – was born 140 years ago. He was responsible for numerous patents and model designs, and today’s TATRA vehicles are still based on his pioneering chassis concept.

In the early years of motoring, a number of Central European car designers and engineers – originally working independently of each other – joined forces to make a major contribution to the development of automotive technology.

Hans Ledwinka was responsible for almost all the ground-breaking technical solutions pioneered by TATRA, the oldest Czech automotive producer (and today the only Czech-owned producer of motor vehicles), during the first half of the 20th century.

Ledwinka was born on 14 February 1878 in the Austrian town of Klosterneuburg. He was proud of his Austrian nationality. He was a German-speaker, and he never managed to learn any Czech; instead he expected everybody to speak German to him. However, he was always willing to recognize excellent work from members of his team – whatever their nationality.

First time, second time…

After completing his studies at an industrial school in 1896, Ledwinka found a job working for a company in Kopřivnice (Nesselsdorf). The Nesselsdorfer Wagenbau-Fabriks Gesellschaft made horse-drawn carriages, railway wagons, and various types of seat covers and similar products. Ledwinka began his career in the railway wagon division. In the following year the company set up a small division making motor vehicles. The head of the new division was the 24-year-old Viennese engineer Edmund Rumpler, who appointed the 18-year-old Ledwinka as his assistant.

In 1902 Ledwinka left the company following a disagreement with the workshop manager Leopold Sviták. He was recruited by a Viennese company run by Alexander Friedmann, where – working alongside Professor Knoller – he built steam engines. Three years later, he left steam technology behind and returned to his former employer in Kopřivnice – this time at the request of the company’s director Hugo Fischer von Rösslerstamm – to develop internal combustion engines. Ledwinka’s first task was to improve the design of the company’s engines and gearboxes. He created the four-cylinder S-type engine with slanted valves and screwed-in valve seats. The engine had a tunnel crankcase with circular openings on the left side providing easy access to the connecting rod bearings. The new gearbox was also a pioneering work of engineering; its bell-shaped structure meant that it only needed five cogwheels.

Ledwinka was now the head of the company’s automotive production division, but he continued to be involved in conflicts with his colleagues – particularly the director Erhard Kölbel. After a major disagreement with Kölbel, who wanted to invest a state subsidy in the railway wagon division, Ledwinka again left the company (in 1916) to work for one of its major competitors – the Steyr-Werke in Graz.

Ledwinka’s engineering legacy

Ledwinka’s second departure from Kopřivnice was to have major repercussions. It was during this period that he became closely acquainted with Ferdinand Porsche, an engineer from North Bohemia, whose later designs for VW showed marked similarities with Ledwinka’s ideas, eventually leading to a dispute over alleged patent infringements.

However, in 1921 Ledwinka returned to his former employer in Kopřivnice once more, when the director Leopold Pasching recruited him to run the company’s newly built car plant (a project that was the brainchild of the engineer Max Reschl).

Two years later, Ledwinka’s efforts were rewarded when production of the TATRA 11 was launched. The car represented a completely original design solution: its chassis was based on a central backbone tube with a two-cylinder air-cooled engine and a gearbox at the front, and a rear suspension unit featuring independently suspended swinging half-axles.

A patent application for the swinging half-axle system had already been filed in 1903 by Edmund Rumpler, who at the time was working for the Adler Werke in Frankfurt. The suspension setup was thus not originally Ledwinka’s idea, but the chassis concept was entirely his own – and it remains his greatest contribution to engineering design. Ledwinka’s TATRA chassis concept was later used in the production of goods vehicles – starting with the T 23 and T 24 (1926). It has been used in TATRA goods vehicles since then, and it continues to be used today.

Turbulent times

The 1930s ushered in a new era for car design at TATRA. Headed by Ledwinka and featuring the German designer Erich Übelacker and Ledwinka’s son Erich, the company’s design team developed cars with strikingly aerodynamic bodywork. In June 1945, after Czechoslovakia’s liberation from the Nazi occupation, Hans Ledwinka – now the deputy director at the Ringhoffer-Tatra company – was arrested and convicted by a people’s court for his contribution to the German war effort. In 1948 he was convicted of having been a collaborator and sentenced to six years’ imprisonment, after which he was to be expelled from the country. Ledwinka and his son Erich had already been investigated by the Czechoslovak police between the two world wars.

A reputation restored

In the 1950s, Hans Ledwinka left Czechoslovakia to settle in his native Austria, and later moved to West Germany. He died in Munich on 2 March 1967.

In his later years, he appeared as a witness in a legal dispute between the Ringhoffer family (the former owners of TATRA) and Volkswagen over alleged patent infringements; he helped to broker an out-of-court settlement. However, Ledwinka himself did not benefit financially from the settlement, as he could not afford adequate legal representation.

On 14 February 1992, Hans Ledwinka was officially rehabilitated by Czechoslovakia’s Supreme Court – 44 years after his conviction for collaboration.

Published under History
March 16th, 2018

Driving a T 603 in the GDR

no comment Posted by smitkees

T603Westphal2

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German:  https://www.carsablanca.com/magazin/Fahrzeug-Vorstellungen/tatra-603-1

Published under History, Personal
February 2nd, 2018

ČR must compensate Tatra ex-chief for unfounded prosecution

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ČTK |
31 JANUARY 2018

Brno, Jan 30 (CTK) – The Czech state has to pay 315,000 crowns plus late payment interest to Ronald Adams, former general director of the Czech Tatra lorry maker, in compensation for his unrightful detention and prosecution, the Brno Regional Court has decided, upholding a lower-level court’s previous verdict.

The information was conveyed to CTK by the Regional Court spokeswoman Eva Sigmundova on Tuesday.

Adams, a U.S. national, claimed compensation worth five million crowns, saying the corruption charges he faced in the Czech Republic have negatively affected his personal and professional reputation.

The appeals court’s verdict is definitive.

Adams2013

Adams, Tatra’s former general director and head of the board of directors, was charged with bribe giving in August 2012. The police said he had offered a bribe of 20 million crowns to then deputy defence minister Martin Bartak in 2009 in exchange for the ministry signing more contracts with Tatra for supplies of lorries to the Czech military.

He faced up to five years in prison, but a court acquitted him in 2013.

Adams said in doing so, the court made it clear that the prosecution, restrictions and also the negative publicity Adams faced in this connection in Czech and foreign media, were unnecessary and unrightful.

On his acquittal, Adams demanded five million crowns from the state as compensation. The Justice Ministry granted 120,000 crowns to him in 2014, but Adams appealed the decision and the Brno Municipal Court raised the sum to 315,000 crowns plus a roughly 8-percent late payment interest, the overall sum reaching 435,000 crowns in mid-2016.

The Brno Regional Court upheld the original verdict earlier this month.

Justice works slowly, but it is a good piece of news that one can finally achieve justice in the Czech Republic, Adams said through Vladimir Bystrov from the Bison & Rose agency that previously represented him.

Adams also figured as a witness in the case of the purchase of Tatra lorries by the Czech military, in which Bartak and Czech arms dealer Michal Smrz faced corruption charges.

Adams accused Smrz of having offered the company help in the negotiations about the supply in 2008 in exchange for 100 million crowns. He also allegedly promised Adams to secure his personal meeting with then PM Mirek Topolanek. A court acquitted both Bartak and Smrz of charges in late 2014 and the Justice Ministry granted a compensation worth 180,000 crowns to each.

Published under History, Tatra Works, Video
February 1st, 2018
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